The Insight Files
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The Insight Files
Consumer trends and news curated by Tourism Australia
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Travel linked to enhanced creativity

Travel linked to enhanced creativity | The Insight Files | Scoop.it

There are plenty of things to be gained from going abroad - new friends, new experiences, new stories. But living in another country may come with a less noticeable benefit too. Some scientists say it can make you more creative. In recent years, psychologists and neuroscientists have begun examining more closely what many people have learned anecdotally: that spending time abroad may have the potential to affect mental change. In general, creativity is related to neuroplasticity or how the brain is wired. Neural pathways are influenced by environment and habit, meaning they are also sensitive to change. New sounds, smells, language, tastes, sensations and sights spark different synapses in the brain and may have the potential to revitalise the mind. Find out more.

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Eve-Line Boulle's curator insight, June 17, 2015 8:21 AM

"How international experiences can open the mind to new ways of thinking ?"

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Why buying experiences makes people happier than buying things

Why buying experiences makes people happier than buying things | The Insight Files | Scoop.it

Want to be happier? Spend money on holidays, classes, and other events. Research shows that experiences are the much better buy — if you’re looking to maximise the happiness for your dollars. In a study of over a thousand Americans, people were asked to think about a material and experiential purchase they made with the hope of increasing their happiness. When they thought on which one made them happier, 57% of them said that the experiential buy gave them more happiness. Only 34% of respondents said material purchases make them happier.


Via Soraia Ferreira, Ph.D.
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Michael Gigl's curator insight, November 4, 2014 9:33 AM

Maybe we are no longer living in a material world

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The science of why you should spend your money on experiences, not things

The science of why you should spend your money on experiences, not things | The Insight Files | Scoop.it

New research conducted by Dr. Thomas Gilovich, a psychology professor at Cornell University, suggests that consumers get more happiness spending money on experiences like going to art exhibits, doing outdoor activities, learning a new skill, or travelling as opposed to buying the latest iPhone or a new BMW. While people's satisfaction with things they bought declines over time, their satisfaction with experiences they spent money on increases. Gilovich's research has implications for individuals who want to maximise their happiness return on their financial investments, for employers who want to have a happier workforce and policy-makers who want to have a happy citizenry. "By shifting the investments that societies make and the policies they pursue, they can steer large populations to the kinds of experiential pursuits that promote greater happiness." Find out more.

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SNMinc WebGems's comment, April 27, 2015 1:07 AM
"So rather than buying the latest iPhone or a new BMW, Gilovich suggests you'll get more happiness spending money on experiences like going to art exhibits, doing outdoor activities, learning a new skill, or traveling.
"-- I still feel, buying latest iphone gives me happiness.. What makes you feel happy? Buying things or travelling?
SecretGreece's curator insight, April 30, 2015 6:53 PM

"Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes!"


A quote by Oscar Wilde

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Anticipation of upcoming travel has a considerable impact on our happiness

Anticipation of upcoming travel has a considerable impact on our happiness | The Insight Files | Scoop.it

"One study, by Leaf Van Boven of the University of Colorado at Boulder and Laurence Ashworth of Queen's University published in The Journal of Experimental Psychology in 2007, found that students felt happier while anticipating a vacation than while reminiscing about the vacation."

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